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Worst dating mistakes and how to avoid them

Worst dating mistakes and how to avoid them

Replatforming your e-commerce storefront may be some of the most rewarding and excruciating work out there. For those who don’t know, replatforming an e-commerce website means to essentially migrate it to a different platform. If you are unhappy with the way your site performs currently, this may be your only option.

According to studies, 63% of marketing executives think that RoI is the only measure of success in e-commerce. This is somewhat true since the measure of a successful business is how much money it makes annually.

However, there are numerous obstacles and potential problems to consider, especially when the e-commerce user experience (UX) is concerned. Let’s take a look at several examples of UX mistakes which you should avoid at all costs when replatforming your e-commerce store.

No time to read this article now? Download the full PDF version for future reference.

Every website has a certain demographic which is predominant. You should use the fact that you are replatforming to do some research into your audience before settling for a user interface (UI) overhaul. If your audience is predominantly older you should focus on large, easy-to-spot UI elements. A young demographic reacts well to colorful images. Research your sales numbers, traffic and social media activity.

See if you can pinpoint the customer profile you work with most of the time to cater the new design to their needs. This is an essential part of e-commerce replatforming and shouldn’t be overlooked given the opportunity.

No site is innocent of retouched photos, staged demonstration videos and stock multimedia. However, you need to make your product media as believable as possible. The site replatforming procedure which you are undergoing is the perfect excuse to review your products and their respective media files.

Don’t rely on photograph manufacturing through Photoshop and other related editing applications. It’s often a better solution to hire one or several photographers and have them take photos of your products instead. Show some respect towards your customers and present them with believable and grounded visual media about the items you have on sale.

We are all guilty of cutting corners and lowering costs in business. After all, the revenue we have at the end of each month needs to go on-site maintenance, stock refresh, online advertisement and other expenses. You should never approach e-commerce replatforming yourself. The user experience of your customers and clients depends on adequate UI solutions present on your site.

There is a plethora of problems which can come up during your site migration and you won’t be able to stop the process once you start. As a matter of fact, it’s a better idea to hire a beginner web designer or a programmer and have them do it for you instead.

Look for affordable professionals who specialize in e-commerce maintenance, web design and coding through freelance platforms and see if you can strike a deal with them. This is a much better alternative to opting for DIY methods of UI and UX overhaul as a site administrator.

There is absolutely no need for including mandatory registration in your e-commerce store. Customers should be able to make purchases based on their payment and delivery info – not based on whether or not they are registered. This doesn’t mean you should exclude the registration capability from your e-commerce site, however.

Instead, make it an extra step for people who want to be recurring customers and get exclusive offers and discounts. Forcing people to do something they don’t feel comfortable doing is a bad UX decision. Be open to as many customers as possible in order to ensure higher revenue numbers and a greater conversion rate.

The navigation bar of your e-commerce store is the most important element of UI present on the site. In essence, your navigation bar should include any and all categories of products which you sell at the moment. Don’t fall for minimalistic design and fail to offer a comprehensive view of your product lineup in the navigation bar.

Instead, separate your products into categories and sub-categories for added browsing comfort. This will make the customers’ site navigation much quicker and easier to manage due to a good nav bar design solution.

Customers that visit your e-commerce store, especially through mobile platforms, hate to see popups riddle their internet browsers. Popups are a dated method of online advertisement which became a bigger nuisance than it was a benefit.

Many users install advertisement blocking add-ons for their browsers simply to avoid being bombarded by unwanted ads which serve no purpose. Establish a professional, clean and easy-to-understand user interface without relying on cheap “scare tactics”.

Advertisements should be placed on banners around the body of your landing and subsequent pages. This will ensure that the customers have a conscious choice of whether or not they want to click on an offer you have prepared.

One of the worst offenders in the bad UX category is an overlong purchase process. It shouldn’t take more than several clicks for your customers to make the final purchase from your store.

Try to streamline your UI so that a customer can reach the order and shipping screen in only a few clicks from the landing page. This will ensure that people want to come to your site when they are short on time and want to get something quickly.

Alternatively, you risk alienating your customers since no one wants to go through several hoops of security checks, identity verification and mandatory registration (see above) just to order an item. You will effectively send a message that the customer should go someplace less convoluted to order the same (or similar) item with much less hassle.

Your customer support should be easy to find in the UI solution you decide on after replatforming. After all, the customers are bound to have questions, concerns and problems no matter how well you design your website.

Make sure that your customer support lines are highlighted no matter what page a customer might be on currently. You can use the footer of your navigation bar to place a readily-available support button for everyone’s convenience. Failing to do so can result in panic and subsequent erosion of your customers due to an inability to get in touch with you.

Give your visitors a voice and talk to them anytime they have issues that need to be resolved. Alternatively, you can set up a chatbot to do it for you if you run an independent e-commerce store and have no support agents available.

Your e-commerce replatforming process will take some time until it settles. However, your site’s development will never cease if you play your cards right.

Make sure to always have new products, categories and content in preparation for the future. Don’t settle for a routine and find ways to iterate on what you created. That way, your customers will always have something new to look forward to and be incentivized to stay loyal to your e-commerce website.

Kristin Savage nourishes, sparks and empowers using the magic of a word. She does her voodoo regularly on the Pick Writers blog and occasionally contributes to other educational platforms. Along with pursuing her degree in Creative Writing, Kristin was gaining experience in the publishing industry, with expertise in marketing strategy for publishers and authors. Now she had found herself as a freelance writer.

We’ve talked about good habits for learning a language plenty of times, but just as important is avoiding bad learning habits. You can spend months not making much progress because you’ve run up against a wall. There’s no one best way to go about learning, but there are plenty of pitfalls that exist. Here are some of the bad habits that are easy to pick up, and how to break out of them.

Having a good learning routine is important whenever you’re learning a new skill. What’s also important, though, is knowing the difference between a healthy routine and a rut. You can waste a lot of time doing the same thing over and over again without making much progress. It’s frustrating, and it can start to feel like the language is unconquerable.

The first and hardest step is identifying you’re in a rut. Have you been doing the same thing for months but feel like you’re not making progress? Is your formerly healthy routine starting to feel stale? Are you focusing too much on only one part of the language and ignoring the rest? Once you realize you’re in a rut, breaking out of it is easy! There are so many options for shaking up your routine, like listening to podcasts in your target language or incorporating more culture into your language learning. Fortunately, this can be a somewhat fun habit to break.

Of all the habits on this list, this habit might be the most specific to language-learning. You have a great routine, you’re learning a lot and understanding more and more of the language, which is all fantastic. One problem: you’re not actually speaking the language. That’s not the end of the world, but if you hope to one day have conversations in your new language, you’re going to need to talk eventually.

The simplest way to break this habit is just to start speaking in the language, but that’s easier said than done. If the only problem is you need a conversational partner, there are plenty of online resources to help you find someone you can practice with. Maybe you could even convince a friend to practice with you! If the problem is a fear of making mistakes, however, that’ll be a bit harder to solve. Just remember that practicing speaking is the only way to get better, and there’s no shame in mistakes.

You’ve got a language-learning app on your phone, and you worked on the language for three hours! Great! But then, because that took up so much time, you skipped studying the next day. And the day after that. Oh, and the day after that. But a few weeks later you studied for a few hours again! Oops, but then you don’t do it for a month after that. Basically, you keep binging every once in a while, but then don’t study at all on the other days (this might also be how you deal with your gym membership). When you don’t see much improvement, there’s not much mystery as to why.

It’s been proven that studying in small chunks every day is better for you than studying a bunch every week or so. It can be annoying to carve out time every day, but there’s bound to be a 15-minute slot in your day where you can devote yourself to the language. Whether it be on your commute, after you shower in the morning or when you’re eating lunch, you’ll notice the improvement that regular studying can make.

As mentioned (a few times already), routines are ideal when you’re learning. And if you’re able to stick to a routine that you set for yourself, that’s great! Maybe you check off each day you learn and keep track of how long your streak is going. But the problem is you’re a little too rigid with your own scheduling. Perhaps you missed one day and now your whole routine has fallen apart. Or you’ll think that if you forget to study in the morning, there’s no way to make up for that. Obsessing over the minutiae of when you learn like this can get in the way of your real learning.

The first thing you have to do when you break one of your self-imposed learning rules is to forgive yourself. Yes, it’s a shame when you forgot for the first time to study the language that day, but that’s life. In an ideal world, you could study every day at the same time and steadily improve, but we definitely don’t live in an ideal world. Don’t fret over the small things, and be flexible when necessary.

You’ve set your routine, you have hundreds of vocabulary note cards and you’re charging ahead in your studies. You’ve made so much progress and things are going great, but then suddenly it all seems to come to a standstill. You keep practicing your language, but it just doesn’t seem to be getting better. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing; everyone hits a plateau when they’re working on a new skill. The bad habit is letting the plateau sap your motivation right out of you.

The first thing to realize is that a plateau is not really a plateau. Yes, it may seem like you’re not learning as much as you used to, but it’s all relative. Whereas in the beginning, every new thing you learn in a language is a revelation. After a while, though, it gets a bit more menial as you learn the intricacies, and so it just seems like there’s not as much progress happening. Just keep going. In the worst case scenario, your plateau means you need to shake up your learning a little bit. The techniques used when you start learning a language won’t necessarily be effective later on. Use your plateau as a chance to challenge yourself to see how much you really understand. You might just impress yourself.

Let’s not mince words, we’ve all quit something. Maybe you quit soccer in the fourth grade, or you quit piano in college. And there are plenty of valid reasons to quit something, so it’s not always a bad thing. But quitting can also be a bad habit, and it happens with language learning. Maybe you’ve quit learning language multiple times, only to come back to it later. Or perhaps you’ve picked up lots of hobbies only to drop them later. Either way, it’s a hard habit to fix.

This one might take some soul-searching. Keeping up your motivation for learning a language is really the only way to avoid giving up on your goals. Why are you learning in the first place? To connect with other cultures? To challenge yourself? To exercise your brain? It’s great to want to learn a language just for the sake of learning a language, but that motivation can fall short when you’re actually doing the work of studying grammar and memorizing vocab. Learning a language is a massively rewarding experience, and it can be hard and frustrating but that’s all part of the process. Imagine the person you want to be, and chase that dream.

We’ve talked about good habits for learning a language plenty of times, but just as important is avoiding bad learning habits. You can spend months not making much progress because you’ve run up against a wall. There’s no one best way to go about learning, but there are plenty of pitfalls that exist. Here are some of the bad habits that are easy to pick up, and how to break out of them.

Having a good learning routine is important whenever you’re learning a new skill. What’s also important, though, is knowing the difference between a healthy routine and a rut. You can waste a lot of time doing the same thing over and over again without making much progress. It’s frustrating, and it can start to feel like the language is unconquerable.

The first and hardest step is identifying you’re in a rut. Have you been doing the same thing for months but feel like you’re not making progress? Is your formerly healthy routine starting to feel stale? Are you focusing too much on only one part of the language and ignoring the rest? Once you realize you’re in a rut, breaking out of it is easy! There are so many options for shaking up your routine, like listening to podcasts in your target language or incorporating more culture into your language learning. Fortunately, this can be a somewhat fun habit to break.

Of all the habits on this list, this habit might be the most specific to language-learning. You have a great routine, you’re learning a lot and understanding more and more of the language, which is all fantastic. One problem: you’re not actually speaking the language. That’s not the end of the world, but if you hope to one day have conversations in your new language, you’re going to need to talk eventually.

The simplest way to break this habit is just to start speaking in the language, but that’s easier said than done. If the only problem is you need a conversational partner, there are plenty of online resources to help you find someone you can practice with. Maybe you could even convince a friend to practice with you! If the problem is a fear of making mistakes, however, that’ll be a bit harder to solve. Just remember that practicing speaking is the only way to get better, and there’s no shame in mistakes.

You’ve got a language-learning app on your phone, and you worked on the language for three hours! Great! But then, because that took up so much time, you skipped studying the next day. And the day after that. Oh, and the day after that. But a few weeks later you studied for a few hours again! Oops, but then you don’t do it for a month after that. Basically, you keep binging every once in a while, but then don’t study at all on the other days (this might also be how you deal with your gym membership). When you don’t see much improvement, there’s not much mystery as to why.

It’s been proven that studying in small chunks every day is better for you than studying a bunch every week or so. It can be annoying to carve out time every day, but there’s bound to be a 15-minute slot in your day where you can devote yourself to the language. Whether it be on your commute, after you shower in the morning or when you’re eating lunch, you’ll notice the improvement that regular studying can make.

As mentioned (a few times already), routines are ideal when you’re learning. And if you’re able to stick to a routine that you set for yourself, that’s great! Maybe you check off each day you learn and keep track of how long your streak is going. But the problem is you’re a little too rigid with your own scheduling. Perhaps you missed one day and now your whole routine has fallen apart. Or you’ll think that if you forget to study in the morning, there’s no way to make up for that. Obsessing over the minutiae of when you learn like this can get in the way of your real learning.

The first thing you have to do when you break one of your self-imposed learning rules is to forgive yourself. Yes, it’s a shame when you forgot for the first time to study the language that day, but that’s life. In an ideal world, you could study every day at the same time and steadily improve, but we definitely don’t live in an ideal world. Don’t fret over the small things, and be flexible when necessary.

You’ve set your routine, you have hundreds of vocabulary note cards and you’re charging ahead in your studies. You’ve made so much progress and things are going great, but then suddenly it all seems to come to a standstill. You keep practicing your language, but it just doesn’t seem to be getting better. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing; everyone hits a plateau when they’re working on a new skill. The bad habit is letting the plateau sap your motivation right out of you.

The first thing to realize is that a plateau is not really a plateau. Yes, it may seem like you’re not learning as much as you used to, but it’s all relative. Whereas in the beginning, every new thing you learn in a language is a revelation. After a while, though, it gets a bit more menial as you learn the intricacies, and so it just seems like there’s not as much progress happening. Just keep going. In the worst case scenario, your plateau means you need to shake up your learning a little bit. The techniques used when you start learning a language won’t necessarily be effective later on. Use your plateau as a chance to challenge yourself to see how much you really understand. You might just impress yourself.

Let’s not mince words, we’ve all quit something. Maybe you quit soccer in the fourth grade, or you quit piano in college. And there are plenty of valid reasons to quit something, so it’s not always a bad thing. But quitting can also be a bad habit, and it happens with language learning. Maybe you’ve quit learning language multiple times, only to come back to it later. Or perhaps you’ve picked up lots of hobbies only to drop them later. Either way, it’s a hard habit to fix.

This one might take some soul-searching. Keeping up your motivation for learning a language is really the only way to avoid giving up on your goals. Why are you learning in the first place? To connect with other cultures? To challenge yourself? To exercise your brain? It’s great to want to learn a language just for the sake of learning a language, but that motivation can fall short when you’re actually doing the work of studying grammar and memorizing vocab. Learning a language is a massively rewarding experience, and it can be hard and frustrating but that’s all part of the process. Imagine the person you want to be, and chase that dream.

For decades, the medical community has ignored mountains of evidence to wage a cruel and futile war on fat people, poisoning public perception and ruining millions of lives.

It’s time for a new paradigm.

From the 16th century to the 19th, scurvy killed around 2 million sailors, more than warfare, shipwrecks and syphilis combined. It was an ugly, smelly death, too, beginning with rattling teeth and ending with a body so rotted out from the inside that its victims could literally be startled to death by a loud noise. Just as horrifying as the disease itself, though, is that for most of those 300 years, medical experts knew how to prevent it and simply failed to.

In the 1600s, some sea captains distributed lemons, limes and oranges to sailors, driven by the belief that a daily dose of citrus fruit would stave off scurvy’s progress. The British Navy, wary of the cost of expanding the treatment, turned to malt wort, a mashed and cooked byproduct of barley which had the advantage of being cheaper but the disadvantage of doing nothing whatsoever to cure scurvy. In 1747, a British doctor named James Lind conducted an experiment where he gave one group of sailors citrus slices and the others vinegar or seawater or cider. The results couldn’t have been clearer. The crewmen who ate fruit improved so quickly that they were able to help care for the others as they languished. Lind published his findings, but died before anyone got around to implementing them nearly 50 years later.

This kind of myopia repeats throughout history. Seat belts were invented long before the automobile but weren’t mandatory in cars until the 1960s. The first confirmed death from asbestos exposure was recorded in 1906, but the U. S. didn’t start banning the substance until 1973. Every discovery in public health, no matter how significant, must compete with the traditions, assumptions and financial incentives of the society implementing it.

Which brings us to one of the largest gaps between science and practice in our own time. Years from now, we will look back in horror at the counterproductive ways we addressed the obesity epidemic and the barbaric ways we treated fat people—long after we knew there was a better path.

I have never written a story where so many of my sources cried during interviews, where they shook with anger describing their interactions with doctors and strangers and their own families.

About 40 years ago, Americans started getting much larger. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 80 percent of adults and about one-third of children now meet the clinical definition of overweight or obese. More Americans live with “extreme obesity“ than with breast cancer, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and HIV put together.

And the medical community’s primary response to this shift has been to blame fat people for being fat. Obesity, we are told, is a personal failing that strains our health care system, shrinks our GDP and saps our military strength. It is also an excuse to bully fat people in one sentence and then inform them in the next that you are doing it for their own good. That’s why the fear of becoming fat, or staying that way, drives Americans to spend more on dieting every year than we spend on video games or movies. Forty-five percent of adults say they’re preoccupied with their weight some or all of the time—an 11-point rise since 1990. Nearly half of 3- to 6- year old girls say they worry about being fat.

The emotional costs are incalculable. I have never written a story where so many of my sources cried during interviews, where they double – and triple-checked that I would not reveal their names, where they shook with anger describing their interactions with doctors and strangers and their own families. One remembered kids singing “Baby Beluga” as she boarded the school bus, another said she has tried diets so extreme she has passed out and yet another described the elaborate measures he takes to keep his spouse from seeing him naked in the light. A medical technician I’ll call Sam (he asked me to change his name so his wife wouldn’t find out he spoke to me) said that one glimpse of himself in a mirror can destroy his mood for days. “I have this sense I’m fat and I shouldn’t be,” he says. “It feels like the worst kind of weakness.”

My interest in this issue is slightly more than journalistic. Growing up, my mother’s weight was the uncredited co-star of every family drama, the obvious, unspoken reason why she never got out of the car when she picked me up from school, why she disappeared from the family photo album for years at a time, why she spent hours making meatloaf then sat beside us eating a bowl of carrots. Last year, for the first time, we talked about her weight in detail. When I asked if she was ever bullied, she recalled some guy calling her a “fat slob” as she biked past him years ago. “But that was rare,” she says. “The bigger way my weight affected my life was that I waited to do things because I thought fat people couldn’t do them.” She got her master’s degree at 38, her Ph. D. at 55. “I avoided so many activities where I thought my weight would discredit me.”

Chances of a woman classified as obese achieving a “normal” weight: 0.8% Source: American Journal of Public Health, 2018

But my mother’s story, like Sam’s, like everyone’s, didn’t have to turn out like this. For 60 years, doctors and researchers have known two things that could have improved, or even saved, millions of lives. The first is that diets do not work. Not just paleo or Atkins or Weight Watchers or Goop, but all diets. Since 1959, research has shown that 95 to 98 percent of attempts to lose weight fail and that two-thirds of dieters gain back more than they lost. The reasons are biological and irreversible. As early as 1969, research showed that losing just 3 percent of your body weight resulted in a 17 percent slowdown in your metabolism—a body-wide starvation response that blasts you with hunger hormones and drops your internal temperature until you rise back to your highest weight. Keeping weight off means fighting your body’s energy-regulation system and battling hunger all day, every day, for the rest of your life.

The second big lesson the medical establishment has learned and rejected over and over again is that weight and health are not perfect synonyms. Yes, nearly every population-level study finds that fat people have worse cardiovascular health than thin people. But individuals are not averages: Studies have found that anywhere from one-third to three-quarters of people classified as obese are metabolically healthy. They show no signs of elevated blood pressure, insulin resistance or high cholesterol. Meanwhile, about a quarter of non-overweight people are what epidemiologists call “the lean unhealthy.” A 2018 study that followed participants for an average of 19 years found that unfit skinny people were twice as likely to get diabetes as fit fat people. Habits, no matter your size, are what really matter. Dozens of indicators, from vegetable consumption to regular exercise to grip strength, provide a better snapshot of someone’s health than looking at her from across a room.

The terrible irony is that for 60 years, we’ve approached the obesity epidemic like a fad dieter: If we just try the exact same thing one more time, we’ll get a different result. And so it’s time for a paradigm shift. We’re not going to become a skinnier country. But we still have a chance to become a healthier one.

We’ll give you. Guaranteed targeted leads · State-of-the-art traffic generation software · Headline-building templates and techniques · Proven methods to streamline your business; making every minute and dollar you spend work itÂ? s hardest for you · All the free training youÂ? ll need to use all of this, and more! Learn how at: http://www. leadsandtraffic. com

Have you ever wondered how can you possibly figure out how to market your Internet business when you’re bombarded with so much conflicting information? Lots of “how to” advice applies to many online businesses.

But avoiding common marketing mistakes will work for EVERY business. If you make even ONE of these mistakes, you’re leaving money on the table:

Mistake #1: Believing, “You can make a fortune online while you sleep. ”

This mistake has a sidekick or two: “Make millions in just 2 hours a day! ” or “Give us a month; never work another full day again! ” and “Make a living working less than 2 hours a day! ” These are tempting; they’re all dangerous.

But these promises aren’t the most amazing part – what’s outrageous is the number of people who buy into them – with their time, their money and their hearts.

Avoid Mistake #1: Ignore pie-in-the-sky promises – you’ll have to spend serious time on a serious Internet business.

Mistake #2: Believing, “You can support yourself online with just a small investment. ”

This headline captures attention, but that’s all it does.

Your Internet business is just that – a business. Develop a budget you can afford; don’t take a risk you cannot. Almost everyone loses some money along the way to making their business successful. Plan for that.

Avoid Mistake #2: Spend a realistic amount of money to grow your business.

Mistake #3 “Get in on the opportunity you’re excited about FAST – before it’s too late. ”

For an Internet marketer, this is probably the worst piece of advice. These pyramid-like “business opportunities” sound too delicious to be true, and they are. It’s never “too late” to begin with a solid business opportunity, and they are likely to generate profits whenever you set up shop.

Avoid Mistake #3: Do your homework before you do anything else!

Mistake #4: Having no marketing plan.

With a little help, anyone can write one. Get started by making lists: a daily task list, a weekly to-do list, monthly benchmarks, and so on. Figure out what you need to do every day to get the number of emails out, flyers distributed, ads placed, press releases written, and articles published to achieve your goals.

Avoid Mistake #4: Outline your battle plan and follow it to the letter.

Mistake #5: Not getting enough visitors to click on your site.

I’m sure you’ve read story after story about people who make mega-bucks on just a few hundred hits a day. Yes, it’s possible you could break the records, too. But it’s quite unlikely you ever will.

If you build your website, they will NOT come. You’ve got to push them there.

Avoid Mistake #5: Use as many methods as you can to drive traffic to your site.

Mistake #6: Sending out sales and recruiting emails all day long.

Some say marketing is a Numbers Game. Is it? Not exactly.

You can calculate the number of prospects you must have to get the number of hits you need to get the number of click-throughs necessary to end up with enough visitors who read your sales message. From there, you can determine how many visitors you need to convert one into a paying customer.

Everyone needs to know their conversion rate, but it’s not about pushing tons of warm bodies to your site. It’s about getting the RIGHT eyes to examine your offer.

Avoid Mistake #6: Get as many targeted leads as you can afford.

Mistake #7: Using weak headlines.

Weak headlines are deleted or ignored. If they’re going to bother to read your copy, you’d better knock ‘em down flat to get their attention first. Don’t spend more time writing sales copy than on writing an attention-grabbing headline. If your headline makes someone open your message or web page, you’re well on your way to making a sale.

Avoid Mistake #7: Learn how to write irresistible headlines.

Mistake #8: Not building a personal prospect list.

The mere fact that someone came to your website, and maybe even skimmed it, is a victory for you! Why let them click away? Make your traffic generating investment worth it’s weight in gold.

If you wouldn’t dream of asking someone for their email address because you just hate doing that, you’re trading principles for profits. You probably have a WEALTH of information about your niche that your visitor would gladly release their email address to receive.

Avoid Mistake #8: Provide an opt-in mechanism on your site so you can follow-up with every prospect.

Mistake #9: Once a prospect becomes a customer, they’re yours.

Wrong! People are fickle, they constantly search for greater value, and they won’t be loyal to you – especially online. On the Internet, it’s fast and easy to click onto the next guy’s offer and then the next guy’s.

After all the time, energy and resources you’ve invested in getting them to purchase from you, don’t ignore them after making the sale.

Avoid Mistake #9: Don’t drop your paying customers from your marketing plan.

Talbert Williams has been involved in Internet marketing for almost 5 years. During that time, he was the #2 salesman for Living Young Today. Generating over $741,183 in sales. (Yes, he was #2, and he DOES try harder!)

Talbert is currently running a very successful online marketing service, Leads and Traffic. He’s researched, tested and acquired countless marketing resources. With the expert team he’s assembled, Talbert can provide you with:

· Guaranteed targeted leads

· State-of-the-art traffic generation software

· Headline-building templates and techniques

· Proven methods to streamline your business; making every minute and dollar you spend work it’s hardest for you

· All the free training you’ll need to use all of this, and more

In addition, Talbert and his team will teach you strategies and techniques to organize and run your Internet business, from now on and into the future – turning it into a money-making machine. Plus, Talbert is personally available to assist all of his clients.

Mistake-Proof YOUR business. Don’t take our word for it – Check out http://www. leadsandtraffic. com, take a test drive, and prove to yourself that it’s the best business-building investment you’ll ever make.

© Copyright 2003 by Talbert Williams – Leads and Traffic. All information, links, graphics, titles, words and phrases are protected by copyright. Dissemination of this report is strictly prohibited.

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